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east. elections are coming up in israel, in jordan, in egypt, iran and elsewhere. we're seeing in front of our eyes more violent change happening in syria. the reverberations of which are being felt on everyone of that country's borders. elsewhere from beirut to bahrain domestic politics is at a low boil ready to burst out in a way that can affect our interests in very fundamental ways. there are two problems at the far ends of the threat spectrum. the iran nuclear challenge on the one hand and the spread of al qaeda and affiliated terrorism on the other that will continue to dominate and lest we forget within a year of taking office both presidents obama and bush, his predecessor, were faced with previously unforeseen events that fundamentally challenged their middle east policies. 9/11 for president bush and the arab spring for president obama. so there's a lot on the agenda. today we're going to take a early look at what will be and what should be the foreign policy of a second obama administration in the middle east. now we at the washington institute, for us this is just the beginn
right, my top issue is that there's all this controversy about whether or not israel is going to go to war with iran. and when president obama spoke about the big yellow bird, i don't think he was talking about the big yellow bird, i think he was talking, you know, big bird on tv, i think he was talking about china. china, you know, chinese people, oriental people are referred to as yellow. china has the largest population on earth, a billion people. they have so many people that they force women to have abortions. they have no respect for human life at all. and china is friends with iran. china is trading partners with iran. if we help israel go to war with iran, then we're going to have to deal with an angry china, and i think that's a really big problem, and we have to just put a stop to it and negotiate peace. >> well, as i said in the opening statement that, um, i really feel that our biggest problem is the deficit, but i believe that the reason why we haven't been able to, um, to lower the national debt is because our political system is broken. and we need to fix it, or this
that immediately border syria and have an impact, and, obviously, israel, which is having already raised concerns as we do about, for example, movement of chemical weapons that might occur in such a chaotic atmosphere. and i could have an impact not just within syria, but on the region as a whole. i'm encouraged to see that the syrian opposition created an umbrella group that may have more cohesion than they've had in the past. we are going to be talking to them. my envoys are going to be traveling to various meetings that are going to be taking place with the international community and the opposition. we consider them a legitimate representative of the aspirations of the syrian people. we are not yet prepared to recognize them as some sort of government in exile, but we do think that it is a broad-based representative group. one of the questions that we're going to continue to press is to make sure that that opposition is committed to a democratic syria, an inclusive syria, a moderate syria. we have seen extremist elements put themselves into the opposition. and one of the things that we have t
Search Results 0 to 2 of about 3